The Again Faster Fit out guide - Choosing the right pull up rig

Author: Adam Lesniak and Sacha Elms   Date Posted:26 April 2018 


Pullup rigs are an essential part of any form of strength and conditioning or gymnastics based gym. Thus choosing the right rig is critical when you’re setting up your space.

Choosing the right pull up rig

 

A pull up rig is essential

Pullup rigs are an essential part of any form of strength and conditioning or gymnastics based gym. Thus choosing the right rig is critical when you’re setting up your space - not to mention that it is no small effort getting it in place. Initial considerations should be: 

  • How much bar space will you need?
  • How much space do you have in the gym?
  • What are the gym’s limitations – does it have low ceilings and/or is it a narrow building?
  • What is your training bias? Is it strength or gymnastics based, or both? How many squat stations would you like? 
  • What accessories work for you? This includes elements such as wallball targets. 

 

Should you choose a wall mounted or freestanding rig?

Once you have answered these questions that are individual to you, the next decision to be made is whether you want a wallmounted or freestanding rig. 
For group classes having a wallmounted rig is best for class clarity. Coaches don’t have to navigate through or around the rig to get to people, and your view of their movement isn’t usually blocked by other people or pieces of equipment on the rig. A wallmounted rig also allows the class to stay together in a more cohesive group, and then is much easier for the coach to address the class as a whole. This type of rig also doesn’t shake when many are using it, which is useful when you have individuals who may be nervous about trying pullups etc. Limiting factors that can seem frightening is ideal when starting people out on new movements. 

Freestanding rigs are typically seen less often than wallmounted, but their value is no less. These rigs are fantastic for competition – they make it fun and easy for spectators to watch. Not only this, they allow many more athletes to fit onto the rig (people are on both sides instead of just one) for whatever movement you choose. 
Freestanding rigs if your space allows, are also great for more PT style or strength and conditioning gyms, where class flow isn’t a necessity. Again, being able to maximise the amount of individuals able to use equipment is ideal. 

As always, if you ever need further advice on what type of rig works for you, make sure you contact us at Again Faster.


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